Cancer

What if all of sudden one becomes shorter

height

Unnoticed vertebrate fracture, also called missed vertebrate fracture, is a common condition in certain group of people.

Doctors can miss it too

Doctors reviewed about two hundreds spinal imaging and found that forty percent of the vertebrate fractures were missed and not reported in the first place. Usually when doctors look into an imaging, they are more careful about the vertebrate fracture when there is osteoporosis. But when the sign of osteoporosis is not there, they obviously neglected the chance of vertebrate fracture in there.

The importance of early detection of vertebrate fracture is the prevention of ongoing severe osteoporosis, which happen not just in the elderly or postmenopausal woman, also in those with malnutrition and hormonal imbalanced individuals, and in these people it can happen as early as the early thirties. So when somebody finds him/herself become shorter all of sudden for 4-5 cm, there is a chance of vertebrate fracture and medical attention should be followed.

Who should be cautious

This is especially true in a person who has sedentary lifestyle, amenorrhea, underweight or just fragile in general.  Early identification of vertebrate fracture can help the early treatment of osteoporosis and then the prevention of future fractures. Surgical intervention can even regain the height of the vertebrate if the osteoporosis is under control at an early stage.

However, if the vertebrate fracture is missed and no further steps are taken to prevent and treat the osteoporosis, bad consequence such as hip fracture and disability could happen. Besides the height reduction, another common symptom is the back pain that is severe, consistent or worsening. It should be watched out whether or not conservational treatments for the back pain are effective.  In the elderly, another cause of back pain is cancer metastasis, which is not related to osteoporosis.

References:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jbmr.3215/abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5547187/

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